Digital Repository Of Antisemitic Narratives

This digital Repository is a compilation of selected examples of antisemitic narratives collected for educational purposes in the frames of the HANNAH project. Project partners from Germany, Greece, Poland, and Serbia identified the following categories: Old anti-Jewish stereotypes and myths, Far-Right extremism, Islamist extremism, Antisemitism and Israel, Holocaust denial and distortion, Antisemitism in traditional and online media, Contemporary conspiracy theories, Visual representation of Antisemitism, and Antisemitism specific for a particular country, and proposed examples of some of the antisemitic narratives typical for those categories.

It is important to emphasize that this Repository does not represent a collection of “all antisemitic narratives.” Still, the proposed examples show that antisemitism exists today in various European societies despite different historical and social circumstances. Some antisemitic narratives are similar, and some are more specific and local.

The Repository is an add-on that complements other HANNAH educational products in its current format. The Repository invites users to think about specific debunking responses to examples of various antisemitic narratives by proposing a range of possible activities. The idea is that users should focus on their local realities and think about the potential responses aimed to debunk and counter various forms of antisemitism.

Some examples:

Antisemitic Messages Near The Novi Sad Synagogue

Category: Old anti-Jewish stereotypes & myths
Tags: (Jewish Collective), (Jewish Power), (Public Space), (Stereotypes),

Sticker - The Jew holds all the strings

In November 2020, a message reading “The Jew pulls all the strings” was found stuck on the sidewalk near the Novi Sad Synagogue. One of the oldest anti-Jewish myths and stereotypes is the one about “Jewish power” and the “global Jewish conspiracy”. In its contemporary form, this myth represents Jews as a powerful, secret, global group, often referred to as a “Jewish lobby”, that manipulates governments, banks, financial institutions, academia, the media, film and entertainment industry, and other national and international institutions, for malicious purposes of Jewish world domination and control. This anti-Jewish myth has been present as one of the most prominent antisemitic narratives in various forms from the New Testament, the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, to anti-globalism and various contemporary conspiracy theories.

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Antisemitic Graffiti On Jewish Holy Sites And Memorials

Category: Visual representation of Antisemitism
Tags: (Public Space), (Violence – Vandalism),

nekrotafeioev2-

The results of acts of vandalism against Jewish sites can be summarized as following: graffiti with religious symbols, swastikas, obscene symbols and desecration of Jewish graves and Holocaust memorials. These attacks take place not just in Athens and in Thessaloniki but all over Greece, which magnifies their implications, considering that only 5 000 Jews live in Greece within a total population of about 10 700 000 people.

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Greed, Money-lending and Usuary

Category: Old anti-Jewish stereotypes & myths
Tags: (Greed – Money and Usury), (Jewish Power), (Stereotypes),

Medieval-Jewish-moneylenders

Since the 12th century, religious myths (Jews as deicides) have been complemented with economic stereotypes. Jews were described as rich and rampant as well as “money-lenders”, “bargainers” and “usurers” – a view still commonplace today. Excluded from land ownership, agriculture, and the Christian merchants’ and handicrafts guilds, Jews were increasingly limited to the small trade, peddler and junk trade. The money trading with interest played a special role, which according to church dogmatics violated divine doctrine and remained forbidden to Christians.

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The Poet’s Scapegoat

Category: Old anti-Jewish stereotypes & myths
Tags: (Greed – Money and Usury), (Scapegoating), (Stereotypes),

Wilhelm_busch

“And the Hebrew, sly and craven, Round of shoulder, nose, and knee, Slinks to the Exchange, unshaven And intent on usury” – Wilhelm Busch (1872). This English translation of a verse in Wilhelm Busch’s “Helen Who Couldn’t Help It” reflects a common trope in German antisemitism: the Geldjude, or the equation of Jews with money and usury, greed and parasitic financial capitalism. In his work Busch puts this opinion in the context of the worldview of a pious uncle who wants to save his niece from the depravity of the big city.

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